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Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

1 edition of Domesday Book or the Great Survey of England of William the Conqueror found in the catalog.

Domesday Book or the Great Survey of England of William the Conqueror

Domesday Book or the Great Survey of England of William the Conqueror

A.D. MLXXXVI

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Published by H.M.S.O. in Southampton .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Latin text followed by English translation.

StatementFacsimile of the part relating to Yorkshire ; introductory notes by Col. Henry James.
ContributionsJames, Henry.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18804331M

King William the Conqueror commissioned The Domesday Book to record the total holdings of his kingdom and their respective values. This Great Survey was the first complete record of property. Domesday Book is the name given to the record of the great survey of England made by order of William the Conqueror in The name first occurs in the famous “Dialogus de Scaccario”, a treatise compiled about by Richard Fitznigel, which states that the English called the book of the survey “Domesdei”, or “Day of Judgment”, because the inquiry was one which none could.

The Great Domesday book records information about over thirteen thousand places in England. Together with the Lesser Domesday Book, it was the foundation of . Domesday Book The Domesday Book was a survey designed to record everything that people owned in England. It was ordered by William the Conqueror (the winner of the recent Battle of Hastings) so that William could determine how much money in taxes he could raise and to give William a better sense of the territory he had just conquered.

  Conny Waters - - It’s time to re-write some history, or at least one part that concerns England’s famous Domesday Book. As previously mentioned on Ancient Pages, the “Domesday Book” is closely related to William The Conqueror (or “William the Bastard”), king of England and Duke of Normandy, (ca. ). Left: William the Conqueror. The Domesday Book was a survey, or census, commissioned by the Norman Conqueror King William I, of his newly conquered lands and possessions in England. It was intended to document "What, or how much, each man had, who was an occupier of land in England, either in land or in stock, and how much money it were worth".


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Domesday Book or the Great Survey of England of William the Conqueror Download PDF EPUB FB2

Domesday Book: Or, The Great Survey Of England Of William The Conqueror A.d. Mlxxxvi. by H. James (Author), Great Britain. Ordnance Survey (Creator)/5(5).

Domesday book, or, The great survey of England of William the Conqueror A.D. MLXXXVI. Fac-simile of the part relating to Norfork by James, Henry, Sir, ; Great Britain. Ordnance Survey. cnPages:   Domesday book; or, The great survey of England of William the Conqueror, A.D by Henry James, Domesday book.

Domesday Book, the original record or summary of William I’s survey of England. By contemporaries the whole operation was known as “the description of England,” but the popular name Domesday—i.e., “doomsday,” when men face the record from which there is. Domesday Book Associated with the reign of William the Conqueror, the Domesday book was created to provide the king with a means of maintaining control over Medieval England.

The Domesday book was created around 20 years after the Battle of Hastings, when William I demanded information about the ownership status of the country he was now ruling.

During the lifetimes of the Conqueror and his sons, royal officials employed politically correct language when describing Domesday Book. They called it a “descriptio (survey) of all England” (in ), a “volumen (volume) kept in the king’s Treasury in Winchester,” the “king’s book,” the “book of the Exchequer,” the “book of Winchester,” and so : Ellie Cawthorne.

Here are some facts about Domesday Book, the great Norman survey of the wealth of England. Domesday Book was ordered by William the Conqueror (William I) in Its main purpose was to assess the wealth of England to aid the system of taxation. Whatever was recorded in Domesday Book was legally binding.

Domesday Book, or the Great Survey of England of William the Conqueror, A.D. (2 vols (also in county volumes); Ordnance Survey Office; Southampton, ) Monochrome photographic facsimile; superseded by the Alecto editions.

Description. Great Domesday Book is the incomplete, last draft of the information collected by the Domesday survey, commissioned by William the Conqueror at Christmas and using a detailed list of questions to record who owned which estate.

Completed a mere seven months later, by 1 Augustthe survey provided a detailed record of 13, settlements in England in thirty-four counties. The Domesday Book, our earliest public record, is a unique survey of the value and ownership of lands and resources in late 11th century England.

The record was compiled ina mere twenty years after the Norman Conquest, at the order of William the Conqueror. William commissioned the.

The results of this survey were written into Domesday Book. Great Domesday contains most of the counties of England and was written by one scribe and checked by a second. Little Domesday, which contains the information for Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk, was.

The Domesday Book was commissioned in December by William the Conqueror, who invaded England in The first draft was completed in August and contained records settlements in the English counties south of the rivers Ribble and. After the Norman invasion and conquest of England inthe Domesday Book was commissioned in December by order of William The Conqueror.

William needed to raise taxes to pay for his army and so a survey was set in motion to assess the wealth and and assets of his subjects throughout the land.

The Domesday Book – Early England’s Most Important Document Patricia Grimshaw The Battle of Hastings in marked the start of William the Conqueror’s rule over England when he defeated the Anglo-Saxon King Harold II on the battlefield. Less than 20 years later, his throne was threatened by Denmark.

The Domesday Book is a record of an enormous survey carried out in England for King William I (the Conqueror), and it was completed in the year It was similar to a census as carried out. (25th May) Cnut IV of Denmark prepares to invade England (Dec) William holds Christmas Court at Gloucester, where the Domesday Book is planned (July) Murder of Cnut IV William crosses to Normandy (9th Sept) William the Conqueror dies early in the morning at Saint-Gervais near Rouen.

Survey of England that William the Conqueror commissioned in to go on rare display Jessica Nelson, the head of medieval and early collections at the National Archives, studies the Domesday book. The Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the great survey, completed in on orders of William the Conqueror, of much of England and parts of Wales.

The aim of the great survey was to determine what or how much each landholder had in land and livestock, and how much it was worth. The World of Domesday exhibition depicts life in 11th century England.

The National Archives is the home of Domesday Book, the oldest surviving public record. Domesday is now available online, and you can search for your town or village, and download images of Domesday along with an English translation of the entry.

You can also access the Discover Domesday exhibition, explaining why Domesday. The results of this survey were written into Domesday Book. Great Domesday contains most of the counties of England and was written by one scribe and checked by a second. Little Domesday, which contains the information for Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk, was File Size: KB.

One of the most interesting examples of land surveying efforts from centuries past is William the Conqueror’s famous Domesday Book (pronounced “DOOMS-day”). Created in AD, this book took two years to compile and contains information on more t settlements in England, including the names of all landowners, the amount of land owned and [ ].

The Domesday Book is one of Medieval England’s greatest treasures. The Domesday Book is closely linked with William the Conqueror’s attempt to dominate Medieval England. Along with a string of castles throughout England, the Domesday Book was to give William huge authority in England.

To further extend his grip on England, William I ordered that a. Domesday Book is the product of an extraordinary survey of England commissioned by King William the Conqueror in It in fact comprises two .